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now taking his latest crackdown to the rest of the country. we'll tell but that. >>steve: after a week of outrage, cbs apologizing for slapping our veterans in the face of one of their most popular shows. too little too late. we're going to report. you are going to decide on the not so amazing race. >>brian: one lucky trucker hits the $338 million powerball jackpot. the other big winner is uncle sam. wait till you hear how much the $338 million jackpot breaks down after they pay taxes. "fox & friends" starts now. >>steve: welcome back to the studio. look who's back after a long vacation. >>gretchen: i knew that rooster called this morning. >>brian: is that how you got up? >>gretchen: i didn't sleep that much. i'm on a three-hour time delay. but glad to be back. nice to come back to a snowstorm on the east coast. >>brian: did you get my promo this morning? >>gretchen: i saw your lips moving and if i was reading lips correctly, i thought i heard you say? >>brian: gretchen carlson will debut her entire vacation picture by picture day by day. >>gretchen: i believe 7:30 eastern time i broug
. >> steve goodman believes he has a solution. the site developed an algorhythm that evaluates resume and produces a score used to identity candidates to interview. >> over two and a half resumes. 75,000 man hours in development. took us a year and a half to get there. >> it indicates the more people that use this service, more accurate it will be in terms of predicting success between applicants and the company. there is no cost to job seekers. employers pay. this graphic design jer using bright.com. she was taken aback when asked for her graduation year and level of education. >> they discrime nate on your age. >> the ceo says applicants never need to worry it only looks at the meat of the res mai. you never have to worry about human bodies. >> a company brighten have strengths and weaknesses. >> a tech position in the bay area will score well and will find great candidates. for other industries such as agriculture won't be as well. we zront a ton of the jobs on our site. >> bright might be taking a search out of job search. in san jose, abc 7 news. >> we've got sandhya patel. >> an
to see you, steve good to see you, chris. >> we were talking about this in the morning meeting. it seems there has been such a change. let's not forget barack obama and hillary clinton when running for president not so long ago were talking about civil unions not gay marriage. it is almost astonishing the change but do you take it as a clue she is running? >> i hope so. but i don't know. i think the reason she came out now is very clear. you know, secretary of state, it wasn't appropriate for her to get into the domestic politically -- >> this is the first thing she's come out publicly about. >> obviously the timing is the supreme court is about to do something and it's the right time to say something and something she believes strongly in. as you said, you know, the world is changing rapidly. you know, i remember in the 2004 presidential campaign i worked for john kerry and dick gephardt two great progressives and being for civil unions in that campaign was considered the leading edge. >> it was a big deal then. >> big deal. in 2016 every democrat running for president will be for marri
. host: all right our last phone call. up next we will talk to congressman steve pearce about his outreach to minorities, women and young voters and then we will turn our attention to capitol hill with earl. we'll be right back. >> 34 years ago fay we began providing access to the kong and federal government. the c-span networks created by america's cable companies in 1979 and brought to you as a public service by your cable providers. >> and we can take pictures with m.r.i. or upset scans or c.t. scans and see the whole thing but there's an enormous gap about how the circuits function in the brain as to how i am able to move my hand or to lay down a memory. we don't know how that works. with technology yet to be invented, so a lot of this is going to be technology invented or nano technology. but we need to be able to record hundreds of thousands of brain cells at the same time and be able to understand how it works. that's brain mas analysis that's at work. we don't really have work yet for milestones and that but it's getting to be a very exciting moment to put together thooth
for employers to review. >> they are check boxing the jobs and applying to thousands of jobs. >> steve believes he has the solution a site developed an algorithm that evaluates a resume and makes a score to identify candidates to interview. >> over two million resumes, 8.5 million job seekers and 57,000 man-hours of development and took a year and a half to get there. >> they say more people that use the service, more accurate it will be in terms of predicting success. >> there is no cost to job seekers. the employer pays. she is a graphic designer and using it for the first time. however, as an older worker she was taken aback when asked her graduation year. >> to discriminate upon your age. >> they say applicants say not to worry. >> it looks at the meat or core of the resume. you don't have to worry about that. >> san francisco based company, it does have strength and weaknesses. >> a tech position will score very well and find great candidates for great jobs. for other industries such as agriculture it won't perform, as well. >> by doing a better job, they may be taking the search out of jo
. >> they are going on line and check boxing the jobs they want to apply for. >> steve believes he has solution. it's called bright.com, they developed an algorithm that evaluates a resume and produces a score. >> over 2 million resumes, 8.5 million job seekers, 20 million job descriptions and 75,000 man-hours development and year and a half to get there. >> it indicates that more people that use the service more accurate algorithm will be in predicting success. >> there is no cost. employer pays. >> he is a graphic designer but as an older worker she was asked for her graduation year and level of education. >> to discriminate upon your age is discriminate. >> applicants don't need to worry. >> algorithm doesn't look at the data but the meat of the resume. so therefore you never have to worry about anything like that. >> a san francisco based company it has strengthens and weaknesses. >> a tech position will score very well and score great candidates for great jobs. for other industries we don't have a ton of jobs on that site. >> so bright might be taking the search out of job search. >> katie: it
, steve miller band and james taylor and they played them over in the pool. they were drinking at so:00 in the morning and i'd throw it in the plant and pretend i drank. but i have to say, coming back from that chip put me on the straighter more narrower path. >> dana: i am completely unqualified to talk about this topic. >> eric: 1800 arrests in panama city. spring break looks fun but it's a lot of bad stuff. >> bob: the towns compete to get the kids to come there. they have drinking contest. >> kimberly: wet t-shirt contests. >> bob: yeah. the girls gone wild, someone said, but i tell you, you are inviting this. imagine the lawsuits that come out of this. >> dana: when did this become a right? >> greg: it's a tradition. >> eric: this is right of through college. >> dana: we have evolved to the point the chinese watch that and say we have nothing to do that. they probably think i wish we could have fun. north dakota is relatively new phenomenon. i went to college two centuries ago. but spring break is when you got away from being at school. >> dana: i had to study. >> bob: i guess dayt
to thousands of jobs. >> steve believes he has a solution. the site developed an algorithm that evaluates your resume and produces a score employers use to identify candidates to interview. >> over 2 million resumes, 8.5 million job seekers, 20 million job descriptions, about 75,000 man hours in development and it took us about a year and a half to get there. >> they indicate the more people who use the service, the more abc news democrat it will -- the more accurate it will be. the employer pays, not the job seeker. clarissa is using bright.com for the first time. but as an older worker she was taken aback when asked for her graduation year and level of education. >> they can't discriminate upon your age or education. >> the ceo said plants don't need to worry. >> the algorithm doesn't look at that data, only the meat or the core of the resume so you don't have to look at human bias on the resume. >> bright does have strengths and weaknesses. >> a tech nation in the bay area will score well in the bay area. other areas, agriculture, it won't perform as well because we don't have a ton of jobs
for and applying to thousands of jobs. >> steve believes he has a solution. it's called bright.com. the site developed an algorithm that evaluates your resume and produces a score employers use to identify candidates to interview. >> over 2 million resumes, 8.5 million job seekers, 20 million job descriptions, about 75,000 man hours in development, and it took us about a year and a half to get there. >> bright.com indicates the more people who use the service, the more accurate it will be. that's in terms of predicting success between the appearly can't and the company. the employer pays, not the job seeker. clarissa is using bright.com for the first time. but as an older worker she was taken aback when asked for her graduation year and level of education. >> they can't discriminate upon your age or education. >> the ceo said applicants don't need to worry. >> the algorithm doesn't look at that data, only the meat or the core of the resume, so you don't have to look at human bias on the resume. >> bright does have strengths and weaknesses. >> a tech position in the bay area will score well.
all millennials who were there at occupy wall street celebrating a life of steve jobs which took place -- is death to place at the same moment that was going on and it was his great way of showing that millennials believe that corporations are part of our world while they can set standards and say we disagree with the financial practices but still celebrate in the court -- great leader and innovator in thinker and being able to hold both of those beliefs of the same time i think is one of the hallmarks of this generation. we don't like these practices but we celebrate the great things that american business and american leaders can do. >> host: i think a lot of people will remember looking back on occupy wall street there were a lot of news clips of someone putting a microphone and a camera and a young person's face and asking why you were here and young people not been able to define the point. and actually that might have been by design and that might have been a success of the summa work out of 50's and the movements ,-com,-com ma successful mass movements are fake and they are undi
is not gng to go away. adam and steve are not going to be married if the supreme court goes against it. there's going to be children that are children of gay couples that are still going to exist. we're still going to have the practical issue to deal with. are we going to tell those children that their family is deserving of less recognition or that they come from a dysfunctional family? are we going to tell that couple that they have less of a right to love each other? so this issue is not going to go away. we have to remember, let's put a name and face to this, the case that's going in front of the supreme court edith winsler, 83 years old, spent 40 years with her partner thea. if thea had been theo, edith winsler would not have had to pay the $600,000 in estate taxes she had to pay when her partner died. that's what we're talking about. that's the kind of equality, but regardless of what the court decides, edith and thea are still going to love each other and still going to be a couple. >> the thing is that edith and t he a don't want separate but equal treatment under the law when it come
ill advised for whatever reason. first iowa republican congressman steve king with the solution for illegal immigration in the form of a construction project on the house floor. >> you can't shut that off unless we build a fence and wall. i want to put a fence in and a wall in. i designed one. this would be an example, then, of how that wall would look. you can also deconstruct it the same way. you can take it back down. i also say we need to do a few other things on top of that wall. one of them put a little bit of wire on top to provide a disincentive for people to climb over top or put a ladder there. we can electrify this wire, not a current that would kill anybody, but would be a deterrent. we do it in livestock all the time. >> now for one that made the loser list. it never came to fruition. "just before advocates for senior citizens plan to host on stage a 24-foot cabin cruiser bearing the slogan "medicare vouchers are a titanic mistake," the capitol police sank the reference judging the symbolic titanic too heavy for the stage. authorities banished it to the side deprivi
solicitor general and steve gillis, one of his former law clerks and they help shepherd through this process. neither of them that the well either and i think they and he made a terrible strategic mistake -- to strategic mistakes. first they made a strategic mistake and believing these hearings have any intellectual con tent. [laughter] seven senators asked him questions and he took them seriously but they had no intellectual content. the senators serge knew what he thought. he left a huge trip record. the correct way to proceed with this political theater. this is something his hearings taught everybody send a note hearing since bork to and handled anything like it. the second error he committed is related to the first. 50 to assess and intellectual exchange, is that the senators earlier entries in the substance, he responded with utmost gravity and not with levity. as i said, bob trent great is the funniest men i've ever met. the only person close as justice ginsburg's has been. he was quicker than anybody seen. most of the questions deserved what it your body should have done this produce
saw millenials who were there at "occupy wall street," celebrating the life of steve jobs, which took place -- his death took place at the same moment that was going on. and it was this great way of showing they we that millenials believe that corporations are part of our world, while they can stand and say we disagree with the financial practices, we can still celebrate a great corporate titan and leader and innovator and thinker, and being able to hold both beliefs at the same time is one of the hallmarks of this generation, we can hold in our head, we don't like these approximates but we celebrate the great things that american business and american leaders can do. >> host: a lot of people will remember looking back on "occupy wall street," a lot of news clips of someone putting the microphone and a camera in a young person's face and asking why you're here, and young people not really being able to define the point. and actually, that might have been by design, and that might have been a success -- a mark of success. eric hopper writes in true believer, the nature of mass movemen
ahead, steve. of the back then, 85% public believed that we should go to war. .ecause of false pretenses it was the biggest mistake since the vietnam war. when you spend that much blood and treasure, now we're in the weakness. you have to choose your battles wisely. the war in iraq is the worst thing. it may mean not be a republican anymore, i can tell you that right now. you guys are awesome. i love this. years.not called in, in we've talked about the iraq war, -- are talking about [indiscernible] i draw the line in the sand. am the 15% that disagreed of ever going to war. i said at the europeans don't care, why should we care? .e spent our blood and treasure will go to chattanooga, tennessee, democratic caller. caller: thank you very much. i would like to say good morning, america. i am a proud vietnam veteran that served under general powell. he was one of the most honest and forthcoming commanders that i ever served under. he brought me back from vietnam in 1971. anyway, here is my point. the fact of the matter is, general colin powell came on the television after the war, after the
management technique is, it's all about people. it i think steve burke believes the same thing. it takes time to put your team together. you never did it just right, and you always are making some changes, but i think we have it pretty close to just right now. a super person taking shows. he is going to use grief when it fails and praised when it succeeds in there will be more of that attention going. we have the same thing in news, the same thing in sports, the same thing in movies. we had coming you know, but ted, some really good ones, some not so good ones, but that is the nature of the content business. for me personally you have to try to be more even than not go so high and go solo and try to continue to look at the people. really good at making the best decisions? you giving them the tools connect the thing that we found, and this is -- a wonderful partner. it just wasn't right any more to go make pilots hoping to find an exit. they could build power plants somewhere else or energy. and so all parts of the company were getting less capital and less investment and less attention and i
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)